Jacques Bardet, 7th Dan Shihan, Edinburgh Scotland, 2-4th March 2018

Jacques Bardet, 7th Dan Shihan, Edinburgh Scotland, 2-4th March 2018
From: Scott Reed posted on 28. Feb 2018, 07:47pm
URL: http://www.edinburghaikido.co.uk

Jacques Bardet returns to Edinburgh for his annual course. Jacques is a senior student of the late Tamura Nobuyoshi Sensei and until recently, ran a full-time dojo in Paris. The course is open to all and everyone is very welcome. Please bring proof of insurance and aikido weapons.

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  • Aikido Shinju-Kai 30th Anniversay Seminar in Singapore, 6-8 April 2018

    Aikido Shinju-Kai 30th Anniversay Seminar in Singapore, 6-8 April 2018
    From: Alexander Lee posted on 28. Feb 2018, 07:47pm
    URL: http://aikidoshinjukai.com/30-anniversary/

    Train with Aikido Masters across 20 over countries. Expecting more than 25 countries with an estimate of 1200 local and foreign participants.

    The seminars will be conducted by 12 internationally-renowned Shihans, all with diverse backgrounds. 11 of them hold the Shihan Title (Master Instructor).
    The event will commence with a two and a half day seminar beginning at Noon on Friday 6th April followed by an Embukai (public demonstration), on the afternoon of Sunday 8th April 2018, and concluding with an Anniversary Gala Dinner graced by local dignitaries and over 800 foreign and local guests at the five-star Mandarin Orchard Ballroom on the evening of Sunday 8th April 2018.

    An important aspect of the Aikido Shinju-Kai 30th Anniversary Seminar(ASK30) is the visit by Waka Sensei Mitsuteru Ueshiba, the great grandson of the Founder of Aikido, Morihei Ueshiba. His visit signifies Singapore as an important centre for the practice of aikido. Along with Waka Sensei, there will also be other distinguished Shihans, Senseis, overseas guests, local dignitaries and other VIPs.

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  • Anita Köhler (6th dan, AIkido Dojo Darmstadt) Passes Away

    Anita Köhler (6th dan, AIkido Dojo Darmstadt) Passes Away
    From: Jun Akiyama posted on 4. Feb 2018, 08:38pm
    URL: http://www.aikido-dojo.de

    I have just received news that Anita Köhler (6th dan, Aikido Dojo Darmstadt, Germany) has passed away. Köhler started aikido in 1987 with Ingo Beardi and then started training with Christian Tissier in 1990. She also studied taichi and bagua with Bruce Frantzis, Lui Jin Ru, and Kong Cheng.

    My condolences to her family, friends, students, and loved ones.

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  • Feb 17, 2018: Aikido Shugyo with Collings Sensei, East Hanover NY

    Feb 17, 2018: Aikido Shugyo with Collings Sensei, East Hanover NY
    From: Jason Mallia posted on 15. Jan 2018, 04:48pm
    URL: http://www.aikidocenters.com/html/ContactUs.cfm

    Shugyo – Training of the Spirit – Join with Aikido 6th Dan Tom Collings Sensei on Saturday February 17 (1-4 PM) at Aikido Centers – East Hanover 55 Eagle Rock Ave, East Hanover, NY 07936 for a day of seated meditation, standing meditation, moving meditation and sound practices just as O-Sensei did in his daily life. Cost of the Seminar is a $30.00 mat fee.

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  • February 9-11th 2018 Michael Friedl Shihan 7th Dan in Calgary

    February 9-11th 2018 Michael Friedl Shihan 7th Dan in Calgary
    From: Andrew Barron posted on 14. Jan 2018, 12:47am
    URL: http://www.calgaryaikikai.com

    Calgary Aikikai is excited to welcome back Michael Friedl Shihan of Aikido of Ashland, Oregon. Friedl Sensei will be teaching from February 9th to 11th, 2018. All styles and arts are welcome to train and learn with this master instructor who has been practicing aikido for over 45 years. For information see www.calgaryaikikai.com

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  • 2018 Kagami Biraki Promotions List

    2018 Kagami Biraki Promotions List
    From: Jun Akiyama posted on 14. Jan 2018, 12:47am
    URL: http://www.aikikai.or.jp/pdf/suisen/h30.pdf

    Aikikai Hombu Dojo has just released its 2018 Kagami Biraki promotions list.

    Congratulations to everyone listed!

    Are there any names you recognize and would like to congratulate?

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  • Aikido Master Koichi Tohei Explains the Concept of Ki (Internal Energy)

    This look back at our martial arts roots comes from the pen of Koichi Tohei (1920 – 2011). Koichi Tohei was a student of aikido founder Morihei Ueshiba and served as head instructor at the Hombu Dojo in Tokyo. He later split from Morihei Ueshiba’s organization and founded the Ki Society.

    Koichi Tohei, who was a 10th-degree black belt when he died, is the martial artist credited with popularizing aikido in the United States. Among his more famous aikido students is actor Steven Seagal.

    —Editors

    “Power of mind is infinite while brawn is limited.”

    Time and time again, our daily newspapers run headlines regarding “Man Throws Piano in Fit of Anger,” “Tiny Woman Lifts Car to Save Son” and other incredible feats. Such stories baffle not only readers but also scientists. For centuries, man has endeavored to find a logical answer for these apparently superhuman deeds without much success.

    But to an aikido practitioner, such astonishing acts are readily understood. If, at a given moment, your mind or spirit coordinates perfectly with your body, incredible strength results — more than 10 times your normal power. This perfect coordination of body and mind, unfortunately, will never occur for the great majority of people. The uninitiated few who gain this power almost always experience it during an emergency.

    But a highly trained person such as an aikido practitioner can execute and command this strength whenever he deems it necessary. The question that follows naturally is, “How can you coordinate your mind with your body?” To answer this question, you must first learn the meaning of ki (mind or spirit).

    Koichi Tohei (right)

    Ki is not a component of your brain, whose chief function consists of thinking. The ki that an aikido practitioner refers to is located at the center of one’s anatomy — a point just below the navel called saika no itten. From this central point, human power or strength originates before flowing to other parts of the body.

    This can best be illustrated by imagining that your body is similar to an electrical mechanism. Your brain operates like a battery. It sends messages to a starter point, which in turn acts like a generator and transmits strength to any part of the body.

    For another illustration, imagine your arms as rubber hoses attached to the saika no itten point, which acts as a valve. The water is the ki. As you release the water, the hoses (your arms) become firmer and stronger as more liquid (ki) flows through them. Your fingers must be fully extended, permitting the ki to flow through them. If your fists are clenched, the force is cut off, very much like bending a rubber hose and thus cutting off the flow of water from the nozzle.

    The karate/kobudo master teamed up with Black Belt magazine to make Fumio Demura Karate Weapons: Complete Video Course. Merging Demura’s classic DVDs with new new kata footage, the program streams lessons on the nunchaku, bo, kama, sai, tonfa and eku bo to your digital device. Details here!

    Paradoxically, ki is simple and plain — yet it is difficult to describe. Ki is around us like the air we breathe. But until we develop ki ourselves to a stage where we can actually feel it within us, explanation will be hard. It is like trying to describe a vivid scene to a person who is blind. Each of us is endowed with ki at birth, but most of us remain unaware of it.

    However, as we develop our ki through training, eventually we can even sense another person applying his ki. Until we are in that position, most exhibitions of aikido will seem phony because all the throws and maneuvers are done with such ease and grace.

    What is aikido and what part does it play in our modern way of living? Aikido literally means “mind together with your opponent’s.” Although aikido is an art of self-defense, self-defense is of secondary importance. Developing ki is the primary objective.

    But in order to develop your ki, one must first learn the throws and movements of aikido. Once these are mastered, you can concentrate on synchronizing your ki with your techniques.

    As our modern world grows more frenzied and chaotic, we tend to create tension within ourselves — eventually, this results in neurosis and often in stomach ulcers. To attain relief, humans have consumed millions of sleeping pills and tranquilizers. But usually these are only temporary expedients. To find permanent relief, many have turned to yoga, Zen and aikido.

    This latter art is intended for modern man because ki training need not be done impassively; it can be performed as one goes about his daily work. Actually, a highly trained aikido practitioner can even keep his ki animated while he sleeps. Aikido training, in addition to developing unknown powers and relaxing tension, also molds character.

    Wang Bo, formerly of Shaolin Temple, is the featured instructor in an online kung fu course from Black Belt. Titled Tree of Shaolin, it streams video lessons to your preferred digital device. Sign up here and start your journey along the 1,500-year-old Shaolin path!

    Consider the case of Tom S. From childhood until his mid-20s, he possessed an uncontrollable temper. “Tom would smash the glassware and kick the door down if I did not have dinner ready on time,” his wife explained.

    “But after he had practiced aikido for about six months, Tom’s character changed immensely. He stopped kicking the door and didn’t bark at the children anymore. I’m so glad Tom studied aikido because we certainly have a happier home now.”

    In Hawaii, there are dozens of documented stories of rough, young punks who once thrashed other people simply because they didn’t like the victims’ appearance, and then changed into proper citizens after aikido training. Aikido is the most recently introduced self-defense art, but it has already established itself in Hawaii and has taken root in California — obviously, for good reason.

    Check out Aiki-Do, a five-volume DVD series from Sam Combes and Black Belt magazine. Order here on Amazon. This article was originally published in the January 1962 issue of Black Belt.

    A Lesson in Pain Management! What Karate Stylists Can Learn From Aikido Stylists

    There are many reasons karate stylists should make friends with people who practice aikido. Here’s a good one: A major fault of the modern martial ways is the narrow-minded view of combat that’s fostered in many dojo.

    For example, Joe Karateka believes his art is the final word in self-defense or character development. Therefore, even if the highest-ranked black-belt aikidoka from Tokyo were to put on a demonstration on Joe’s front lawn, Joe would rather be in the backyard whacking his makiwara. (Don’t be smug, all you aikidoka who are reading this. Practitioners of judo, kendo and other budo are the same way. You make disparaging remarks about other arts, and you don’t know anything about them.)

    The reason I’m suggesting you befriend some aikido practitioners, however, isn’t to foster understanding between martial artists or anything quite so noble. It’s because aikido techniques can teach you some valuable lessons about how to manage pain.

    Haruo Matsuoka Photo by Robert Reiff

    I know that some of you will tell me you could write a book on the subject. If your karate training is even halfway serious and you’ve been at it for a while, you already know a lot about pain. I hope you weren’t seriously injured in the process, but I expect you absorbed your share of bruises, sprains and a host of other physical misfortunes that often accompany karate practice.

    Furthermore, I’ll bet nearly all those injuries came suddenly and unexpectedly. You stopped a reverse punch with your nose. You tried to throw a roundhouse kick at head level when your hip and groin muscles wanted to kick at stomach level. You went one-on-one with the makiwara and found that your fist and hips were stable as all get-out but your wrist was just a little weak.

    The kinds of pain we encounter in karate tend to be like that. Karate — except for those few systems that concentrate on grappling — doesn’t feature the kind of pain you can inflict slowly and deliberately, in gradually increasing degrees. Aikido, on the other hand, specializes in it. You’ll also find similar techniques in the Chinese art of chin-na. (I’m using the example of aikido because that’s the martial art with which most karateka are most familiar, and they’ll probably feel more comfortable in an aikido dojo than in a training hall for a non-Japanese art.)

    Order your copy of Stay in the Fight: A Martial Athlete’s Guide to Preventing and Overcoming Injury, by Danny Dring and Johnny D. Taylor. It’s on sale at Amazon now!

    But wherever you choose to go, you should go. Show up before the classes begin or after they’re over, and bring a case of soda or some other gift. Explain to the instructor what you want to learn and ask him to teach you some basic pinning techniques that inflict pain as well as immobilize the opponent.

    Nikkyo, the “second teaching,” is a good one; sankyo, the “third teaching,” is even better. These are sophisticated methods, so you won’t learn all their subtleties in a short time. What you want is to be able to execute them on a partner who’s going along with the movement. I’m not talking about making a wrist lock work in combat because even a skilled aikido exponent might not want to rely on pain-compliance techniques in a real fight. Rather, I’m talking about what they can teach you.

    I have seen skilled karateka receive instruction in such techniques for the first time, and it’s a remarkable event. You can see them go from skeptics about the efficacy of the locks to real believers in the space of half a second — the length of time it takes to have their wrist captured and controlled.

    What’s most interesting about this reaction is how uncontrolled it is. These same karateka might barely react to a punch that splits their lip. They’re accustomed to that kind of pain. However, in most cases, the pain of a wrist lock is entirely foreign to them, and they respond dramatically and without any sense of self-control. That’s precisely why they need to feel it.

    Kelly McCann’s Combatives Self-Defense Course, a new remote-learning program from Black Belt, will help you fine-tune your street-defense skills using your tablet or smartphone!

    The joint locks of an art like aikido cause intense pain, but when done correctly, they don’t inflict any injury. Now, I’m not suggesting you go to an aikido dojo and ask to have your wrist broken. What I want you to do is have the lock applied, learn to do it yourself and then practice executing the technique. You’ll find that, with time and training, your reaction is much less immediate.

    You’ll also begin to see that even when you know pain is coming, it’s something over which you have some control. You can learn to compartmentalize and accept it without letting the sensation absorbing your entire attention.

    Believe me, the first time you have a good wrist lock applied, you’ll be thinking about nothing else but the pain. At this stage, it’s an almost complete control over your body. Consequently, it isn’t uncommon for someone who’s inexperienced with this kind of pain to collapse, lose control of his balance and posture, and land in a heap on the floor. It’s not unheard of for beginners to wet their pants when certain locks are applied — dramatic and embarrassing proof of just how much of our control we surrender to this sensation.

    One of the many classics Dave Lowry has written is Moving Toward Stillness: Lessons in Daily Life From the Martial Ways of Japan. Order it today on Amazon.

    Western forms of grappling, like wrestling, usually seek to control an opponent’s body by immobilizing it. When you’re pinned to the mat, you lose your leverage and the effective use of your limbs. You can no longer mount an offense. The bulk of judo’s newaza (grappling techniques) effect the same results.

    Holds that emphasize pain, on the other hand, immobilize an opponent by distracting him so he can’t attack you further. You can learn to escape holds in wrestling by perfecting counter-techniques, improving your strength and flexibility, and so on. To compete effectively against pain, however, you must have a mentality that can deal with its effects without surrendering control of your whole body and your means of defense.

    Learning aikido’s basic locks and holds is an excellent way to start developing this ability.

    Dave Lowry is a freelance writer who has trained extensively in the Japanese and Okinawan arts. He started writing Karate Way for Black Belt in 1986.

    Kyoichi Inoue (10th dan, Yoshinkan) Passes Away

    Kyoichi Inoue (10th dan, Yoshinkan) Passes Away
    From: Jun Akiyama posted on 24. Dec 2017, 03:38pm

    I have received word that Kyoichi Inoue (10th dan, Yoshinkan Aikido) has passed away. Born in 1935, he started training at the newly founded Aikido Yoshinkan in 1955, becoming uchideshi under Gozo Shioda. He taught metropolitan police officers as a martial arts instructor from 1970 until 1994. Inoue became the second director of the Yoshinkan in 2002. He received his 9th dan from Shioda in 1992 and his 10th dan in 2009 from the International Budo Federation.

    My condolences go out to his family, friends, students, and loved ones.

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  • Meido Moore & John Mazza in Chicago, Feb 9-11, 2018

    Meido Moore & John Mazza in Chicago, Feb 9-11, 2018
    From: Kristen Radtke posted on 1. Jan 2018, 02:03am
    URL: http://www.shinjinkai.org/kangeiko-signup

    Meido Moore Sensei (6th dan) and John Mazza Sensei (6th dan) will lead Shinjinkai’s annual Kangeiko, winter training seminar, in Chicago. All are welcome. Info and registration at www.shinjinkai.org.

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